Subject Information

SUBJECT stereoscopic photographs
TYPE AAT
REFERENCE ID 300162872
NOTES Refers to double pictures of the same scene that produce the effect of three dimensionality when viewed through a stereoscope. They were first envisioned in 1832 by the English physicist Charles Wheatstone, who described this as a uniquely photographic art form, since a draftsman could not draw two scenes in exact perspective from viewpoints separated only 2 1/2 inches, which is the normal distance between human eyes necessary for the three-dimensional effect. Wheatstone's mirror stereoscope was not practical for use with photographs, and the invention was not popular until the 1850s, when Sir David Brewster, a Scottish scientist, designed a simpler viewing instrument. The introduction of the collodion process, which simplified exposure and printing techniques, allowed three-dimensional photographs to become a popular craze.
HIERARCHY Objects Facet>Visual and Verbal Communication>Visual Works>visual works (works)>photographs>stereoscopic photographs
CHILDREN stereographs

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